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Djuardi Y., Wammes L.J., Supali T., Sartono E., Yazdanbakhsh M.
6507800820;6506342543;6602742029;6701506022;7006269286;
Immunological footprint: The development of a child's immune system in environments rich in microorganisms and parasites
2011
Parasitology
138
12
1508
1518
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Department of Parasitology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Indonesia, Salemba 6, Jakarta 10430, Indonesia; Department of Parasitology, Leiden University, Medical Center, Albinusdreef 2, Leiden, ZA 2333, Netherlands
Djuardi, Y., Department of Parasitology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Indonesia, Salemba 6, Jakarta 10430, Indonesia, Department of Parasitology, Leiden University, Medical Center, Albinusdreef 2, Leiden, ZA 2333, Netherlands; Wammes, L.J., Department of Parasitology, Leiden University, Medical Center, Albinusdreef 2, Leiden, ZA 2333, Netherlands; Supali, T., Department of Parasitology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Indonesia, Salemba 6, Jakarta 10430, Indonesia; Sartono, E., Department of Parasitology, Leiden University, Medical Center, Albinusdreef 2, Leiden, ZA 2333, Netherlands; Yazdanbakhsh, M., Department of Parasitology, Leiden University, Medical Center, Albinusdreef 2, Leiden, ZA 2333, Netherlands
The shaping of a child's immune system starts in utero, with possible long-term consequences in later life. This review highlights the studies conducted on the development of the immune system in early childhood up to school-age, discussing the impact that environmental factors may have. Emphasis has been put on studies conducted in geographical regions where exposure to micro-organisms and parasites are particularly high, and the effect that maternal exposures to these may have on an infant's immune responses to third-party antigens. In this respect we discuss the effect on responses to vaccines, co-infections and on the development of allergic disorders. In addition, studies of the impact that such environmental factors may have on slightly older (school) children are highlighted emphasizing the need for large studies in low to middle income countries, that are sufficiently powered and have longitudinal follow-up components to understand the immunological footprint of a child and the consequences throughout life. Copyright © 2011 Cambridge University Press.
atopy; co-infection; helminth; immune responses; infant; Maternal exposure; school-age children; vaccination
albendazole; praziquantel; transforming growth factor beta1; allergy; article; atopy; breast feeding; child; child development; childhood; disease course; environmental exposure; environmental factor; follow up; helminth; hookworm infection; human; immune response; immune system; innate immunity; intestine flora; lowest income group; malaria; maternal nutrition; microfilariasis; microorganism; mixed infection; nonhuman; parasite; parasitosis; priority journal; randomized controlled trial (topic); schistosomiasis; Trypanosoma; vaccination; Adolescent; Allergens; Child; Child, Preschool; Coinfection; Environment; Female; Helminthiasis; Humans; Immune System; Infant; Infant, Newborn; Maternal Exposure; Pregnancy; Pregnancy Complications, Parasitic; Skin Tests; Vaccines; Vermes
00311820
PARAA
21767432
Article
Q1