Publikasi Scopus 2023 per tanggal 31 Oktober 2023 (754 artikel)

Permana D.H.; Hasmiwati; Suryandari D.A.; Rozi I.E.; Syahrani L.; Setiadi W.; Irawati N.; Rizaldi; Wangsamuda S.; Yusuf Y.; Irdayanti; Aswad H.; Asih P.B.S.; Syafruddin D.
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The potential for zoonotic malaria transmission in five areas of Indonesia inhabited by non-human primates
2023
Parasites and Vectors
16
1
267
0
Doctoral Program in Biomedical Science, Faculty of Medicine, University of Indonesia, Jakarta, Indonesia; National Research and Innovation Agency (BRIN), Eijkman Research Center for Molecular Biology, Cibinong, Indonesia; Department of Biology, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, University of Andalas, Padang, Indonesia; Department of Biology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Indonesia, Depok, Indonesia; Doctoral Program in Faculty of Medicine, University of Hasanuddin, Makassar, Indonesia; Doctoral Program in Department of Biology, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, University of Indonesia, Jakarta, Indonesia; Department of Parasitology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Hasanuddin, Makassar, Indonesia
Permana D.H., Doctoral Program in Biomedical Science, Faculty of Medicine, University of Indonesia, Jakarta, Indonesia, National Research and Innovation Agency (BRIN), Eijkman Research Center for Molecular Biology, Cibinong, Indonesia; Hasmiwati, Department of Biology, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, University of Andalas, Padang, Indonesia; Suryandari D.A., Department of Biology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Indonesia, Depok, Indonesia; Rozi I.E., National Research and Innovation Agency (BRIN), Eijkman Research Center for Molecular Biology, Cibinong, Indonesia, Doctoral Program in Faculty of Medicine, University of Hasanuddin, Makassar, Indonesia; Syahrani L., National Research and Innovation Agency (BRIN), Eijkman Research Center for Molecular Biology, Cibinong, Indonesia, Doctoral Program in Department of Biology, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, University of Indonesia, Jakarta, Indonesia; Setiadi W., National Research and Innovation Agency (BRIN), Eijkman Research Center for Molecular Biology, Cibinong, Indonesia; Irawati N., Department of Biology, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, University of Andalas, Padang, Indonesia; Rizaldi, Department of Biology, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, University of Andalas, Padang, Indonesia; Wangsamuda S., Department of Parasitology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Hasanuddin, Makassar, Indonesia; Yusuf Y., Department of Parasitology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Hasanuddin, Makassar, Indonesia; Irdayanti, Department of Parasitology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Hasanuddin, Makassar, Indonesia; Aswad H., Department of Parasitology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Hasanuddin, Makassar, Indonesia; Asih P.B.S., National Research and Innovation Agency (BRIN), Eijkman Research Center for Molecular Biology, Cibinong, Indonesia; Syafruddin D., National Research and Innovation Agency (BRIN), Eijkman Research Center for Molecular Biology, Cibinong, Indonesia, Department of Parasitology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Hasanuddin, Makassar, Indonesia
Background: Indonesia is home to many species of non-human primates (NHPs). Deforestation, which is still ongoing in Indonesia, has substantially reduced the habitat of NHPs in the republic. This has led to an intensification of interactions between NHPs and humans, which opens up the possibility of pathogen spillover. The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence of malarial parasite infections in NHPs in five provinces of Indonesia in 2022. Species of the genus Anopheles that can potentially transmit malarial pathogens to humans were also investigated. Methods: An epidemiological survey was conducted by capturing NHPs in traps installed in several localities in the five provinces, including in the surroundings of a wildlife sanctuary. Blood samples were drawn aseptically after the NHPs had been anesthetized; the animals were released after examination. Blood smears were prepared on glass slides, and dried blood spot tests on filter paper. Infections with Plasmodium spp. were determined morphologically from the blood smears, which were stained with Giemsa solution, and molecularly through polymerase chain reaction and DNA sequencing using rplU oligonucleotides. The NHPs were identified to species level by using the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I gene and the internal transcribed spacer 2 gene as barcoding DNA markers. Mosquito surveillance included the collection of larvae from breeding sites and that of adults through the human landing catch (HLC) method together with light traps. Results: Analysis of the DNA extracted from the dried blood spot tests of the 110 captured NHPs revealed that 50% were positive for Plasmodium, namely Plasmodium cynomolgi, Plasmodium coatneyi, Plasmodium inui, Plasmodium knowlesi and Plasmodium sp. Prevalence determined by microscopic examination of the blood smears was 42%. Species of the primate genus Macaca and family Hylobatidae were identified by molecular analysis. The most common mosquito breeding sites were ditches, puddles and natural ponds. Some of the Anopheles letifer captured through HLC carried sporozoites of malaria parasites that can cause the disease in primates. Conclusions: The prevalence of malaria in the NHPs was high. Anopheles letifer, a potential vector of zoonotic malaria, was identified following its collection in Central Kalimantan by the HLC method. In sum, the potential for the transmission of zoonotic malaria in several regions of Indonesia is immense. Graphical Abstract: [Figure not available: see fulltext.] © 2023, BioMed Central Ltd., part of Springer Nature.
Anopheles; Indonesia; Infection; Malaria vector; Non-human primates; Plasmodium species; Zoonotic malaria
Animals; Anopheles; Humans; Indonesia; Macaca; Malaria; Mosquito Vectors; Plasmodium knowlesi; Primates; cytochrome c oxidase; internal transcribed spacer 2; oligonucleotide; adult; Anopheles; Article; blood sampling; blood smear; DNA extraction; DNA marker; DNA sequencing; dried blood spot testing; female; Indonesia; malaria; male; nonhuman; Plasmodium; Plasmodium coatneyi; Plasmodium cynomolgi; Plasmodium inui; Plasmodium knowlesi; polymerase chain reaction; prevalence; primate; wildlife; animal; Anopheles; genetics; human; Macaca; malaria; mosquito vector; parasitology; Plasmodium knowlesi; primate; veterinary medicine
National Research and Innovation Agency Indonesia; Ministry of Environment and Forests, MoEF; Universitas Indonesia, UI; Universitas Andalas; Kementerian Pendidikan, Kebudayaan, Riset, dan Teknologi, MECRT
Funding text 1: We wish to thank Lembaga Penelitian dan Pengabdian Pada Masyarakat, the University of Hasanuddin, the University of Andalas, Direktorat Riset dan Pengembangan, the University of Indonesia, and the National Research and Innovation Agency Indonesia, for their continued support and encouragement. The authors are grateful to Balai Konservasi Sumber Daya Alam (Ministry of Environment an
BioMed Central Ltd
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Article
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